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20121229
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Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
>> brown: we remember general norman schwarzkopf-- the man who commanded american-led forces in the persian gulf war known as "desert storm." >> warner: plus, mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the final weekend has now arrived before the fiscal cliff hits on new year's day and with it, more than $600 million in tax hikes and spending cuts. in a last bid for a deal, president obama stated his terms face-to-face to top republicans and democrats. >> congressional leaders arrive ted white house this afternoon for their
're remembering a military legend and larger than life american. general norman schwarzkopf who died yesterday in florida from complications from pneumonia at age 78. here is nbc's andrea mitchell. >> reporter: nicknamed "stormin' norman" for his legendary temper, norman schwarzkopf was an american original. he used his prewar briefings to try to scare saddam hussein into backing down. >> the iraqis are dumb enough to attack, they are going to pay a terrible price for it. >> they dare come across that border and come down here, i'm completely confident we're going to kick his butt when he gets here. >> reporter: when the decision to go to war was made, schwarzkopf was ready with a plan to outflank the iraqi forces with a sweeping army movement. >> instead of battering away at the fourth-largest army in the world, he encircled it. world, he i think a lot of american troops are alive today because of his sense of strategy. >> reporter: former president bush with brian williams last year. >> i remember when he came and presented his plan at camp david to us and then we fine-tuned it a little bit
norman schwarzkopf an american original. schwarzkopf who command can the operation that drove iraqi forces out of kuwait in 1991 died yesterday at age 78. the cause of death was respiratory failure, though david martin says he also suffered from alzheimer's in his later years. tonight a look back at an extraordinary life. mandeporter: stormin' norman schwarzkopf was a revelation, a hisismatic combat commander who rose out of the ashes of his own and the country's disillusionment after vietnam. the nickname applied to both his fighting and management style, as he once told "60 minutes." >> i said, listen, i wear my heart squarely on my sleeve. if i don't like something, sere's going to be no doubt in inur mind that i don't like it, and if i like something, there will be no doubt in your mind that i like it. >> reporter: he routed saddam hussein's army, first with an air war for which he provided the soundtrack. >> the simple fact of the matter is now every time an iraqi airplane takes off the ground, lane running away. >> reporter: then with a ground war which sent saddam's troops in
daughter who said to you on the phone, norman schwarzkopf if you die i will never speak to you again. >> that was my wife. >> what is that story? >> the night the war was supposed to start, the decision was made 48 hours, i needed 48 hours -- we needed 48 hours to get everything rolling, to get the airplanes in the air, get the bombers loaded up, get the refueling set up. we needed 48 hours. after the january 15 deadline we got the word ok, it is a go. then you put all of that being in motion then there is nothing you do. you sit there. the night before the war was about to begin about 11:00 or 12:00 at night i did what most people do. i sat down and wrote a letter to my family. by this time, we heard all the stuff about chemical missiles and we did not know if they were going to fire chemical missiles and we were going to have mass casualties. we did not know what was going do happen. even though i talked to them on the phone, twice a week, it was important for me to sit down and write a letter to my family and tell them how i felt about them. i wanted them to know that at the last
th. for more information, go to studentcam.org. >> retired general norman schwarzkopf, commander of forces in desert shield and desert storm died. he commanded a u.s.-led coalition which drove forces under saddam hussein out of kuwait. george is to be bush said that the general epitomized the to become a service, a country creed that has defended the country's freedom and the defense secretary described the four-star army general as one of the great military giants of the 20 century. next, an interview with the retired general on his autobiography. >> general norman schwarzkopf author of "it doesn't take a hero." "almost every soldier in -- almost every general in desert shield served in vietnam. how much did this impact the rest of your career? >> it had more impact than any other experience i had in my entire military career. many of the decisions that i made in desert storm and desert shield or a direct result of things that we have learned from our vietnam experience. maybe not things that have gone well. you learn just as much piscine things done wrong. you say, i never do i
of general norman schwarzkopf. tonight the story behind the name, that it turns out, he didn't like. he was a four star general after his tough talk and the action that followed. his troops battling rocky forces from kuwait in 100 hours of the first gulf war. it turns out, the general known for his swift victories, didn't like that nickname, preferring the one his troops called him, the bear. while he was tough, he had a gentle side, honest and candid in this moment with barbara walters. >> were you ever scared? >> sure. i've been scared in every war i've ever been in. >> if you could meet saddam hussein, what would you ask him or say to him? >> get out of town. >> a west point grad and decorated officer for his time in vietnam, he spent his entire life in the army. when saddam hussein invaded kuwait in 1990, stormin' norman became a household name. >> as far as saddam hussein being a great military strategist, he is neither a strategist, nor is he schooled in the operational art, nor is he a tactician, nor is he a general, nor is he as a soldier. other than that, he's a great military
and made it look easy. david martin on the death of general norman schwarzkopf and what the world did not know thout him. and "on the road" with steve hartman as a man tries to save his wife of 56 years. an unusual request that gets a unrprising response. >> got two of them and i only need one. captioning sponsored by cbs
, juliet. let's talk about some of his greatest achievements. >> norman schwarzkopf was a american hero i never had the privilege of working for him myself. he was the right man in the right place at the right time for desert storm he was one of those increasingly rare generals who won his war. apart from the brilliant military operation desert storm. his real contribution. his unique contribution is that because he grew up in the middle east and spent time there he he understood the mentality and culture. he was able to per said the sad did is to allow half a million on the soil of saudi arabia without which the campaign wouldn't have worked. beyond that, he was an officer who really understood that sometimes you have to fight in vietnam he was courageous officer with three silver stars and other awards for battlefield heroism not just for pushing papers. schwarzkopf did anger people. >> juliet: storm minute norman. >> his thought was i don't have time for fools. if i can win this war and bring most of my soldiers home i don't care who likes me. as far as i'm concerned that's the attitud
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)